Why I Blog, and I understand.

Andrew Sullivan’s article on why he blogs brings out a lot of things that I normally wouldn’t have thought of in an every day perspective. He explains that blogging is an incredibly important form of media for writers because you can get almost instant feedback no matter what your topic of discussion or blogging is. Sullivan goes to explain that he started out as a freelance writer and felt the need to be “online” like many others were in order to get his name out into the world. How he compares a blog to an old ship log and a diary is actually brilliant because a blog post is more personal than an article in a paper or a novel about a particular subject. The thing about it being like a diary is that you can go back in time through it. You can look back on your blog and see how things were in your head at the time and what was happening in life during the times you broadcasted. He uses the example of 9/11 when he was posting and others all over the world were in response to him and were talking about the tragedy all at once. It was a huge connection with everyone out there. There’s more personality to a blog and what is a little more frightening is that there is almost faster feedback, both good and bad. Everyone is a critic out here but the more criticizing you get, the more ethos and popularity you obtain. It’s a win win scenario. Something that Sullivan brings up is that blogging is more of a broadcast and not a publication. If one stops blogging, they will lose popularity and notability. It takes some guts to put your work onto the world wide web, a place where nearly anybody with a computer can access your work. According to Sullivan, another thing that makes blogging special is that you can include links and sources infinitely easier than any other kind of publication in the world. Having to write in the column in a newspaper or magazine takes time and permission and such things like that versus using the internet to instantly do these things without hassle. One of Andrew Sullivan’s final notes is that a successful blogger will balance his or her own takes on the world versus others’. Blogging is a new frontier for journalism and should be looked at in a positive light. Since it’s basically a postmodern device it holds a few hindrances such as perspective change and no stable truth. To conclude, Sullivan appears to encourage blogging no matter what is perceived as concrete. It’s a new era for media coverage and is key to getting one’s voice out in the open in a fast way.

 

 

 

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/11/why-i-blog/307060/

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4 thoughts on “Why I Blog, and I understand.

  1. I completely agree with the points you highlighted on about Why Blog. Blogging is such a different writing experience compared to your average rhetoric analysis paper. However, I didn’t realize exactly how different it was until we started doing more research as a class and reading up on different writing styles. Why Blog reminded me that my peers cannot only read my work, but comment on my work. This is very beneficial because they can challenge me to work harder and put more thought into my work as opposed to the typical process of type, print, staple and turn in. When I am stuck on something or have a writer’s block, there is always the option of browsing through my classmates’ blogs for inspiration. I can see the different angles in which they are approaching the paper and how it is benefitting them.

  2. I really like the point you made about how you can use your diary or blog to reflect back on how you used to be and see how you’ve changed over time. The point about popularity really got me thinking about how difficult it must be having a really popular blog. People can be really mean and if someone’s blog is really popular, than that’s going to attract more mean and negative people, or “trolls”, and I really think I would have trouble with that. Sullivan says that writers tend to have a paper thin emotional skin, and that could be tough for those people.

  3. I completely agree with everything you said! Andrew Sullivan made me look at blogging in a completely different way than I did before. It opened up my eyes to all the things that could come from blogging. My favorite part was how he could connect to certain events that would happen in the world and relate to other bloggers and see how they felt too. And it made me realize how important it is to take other people’s suggestions into consideration because they might notice something that we could do better that we can’t see ourselves for our paper, exactly the same way with blogging!

  4. Blogging makes me question what journalism is. I really don’t know what to think. I can see how blogging opens people up to discussions, but I also believe that this can put limitations on writing. And how is blogging journalism when it is not fact based.
    I believe you are right in the sense blogging is just like writing a diary.

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